Tag Archives: Arromanches

Ste Honorine des Pertes, Normandie, Tuesday, 19th February 2013

Standard
Utah Beach

Chariot racing at Utah Beach

 

We are staying at this private motorhome aire on the D514 or Omaha Beach Road.  It has room for 35 motorhomes, the price of €6 includes electricity and it’s open all year.  There is only just another van here at the moment (just after midday), so we have lots of space around us as well as being nicely secluded by a hedge.  It’s very sunny and warm, as it’s been all week: just what I needed!

 

Monument to the American forces who landed at Utah Beach

Monument to the American forces who landed at Utah Beach

 

This morning we drove to Utah Beach, after spending the night at Isigny-sur-Mer, famous for its butter.  Once again, it was quite harrowing to see the monuments erected to the American soldiers fallen in WWII and frightening to see all the war paraphernalia left behind: tanks, air-raid guns, tank traps, etc.  There is also a museum here, but as we had already visited Arromanches and Juno’s previously, (http://fatimasaysell.com/2011/11/18/juno-beach-sun…t-october-2010/ ‎) we decided just to enjoy the walk in the sunshine and admire the enormous beach and the horses training on it for some sort of ‘chariot’ races.

WWII tank by museum

WWII tank by museum

 

Another tribute to the American forces

Another tribute to the American forces

 

Feb 13 109

 

We thought the Utah Beach campsite would be open, as it said in the guide, but it’s shut until April, so we started making our slow way back east, and here we are at St Honorine-des-Pertes, between Omaha and Arromanches.

 

Tank traps by Museum

Tank traps by Museum

Utah marvellous and enormous beach today

Utah marvellous and enormous beach today

 

A lone chariot

A lone chariot

 

We also enjoyed our quiet stay at the aire at Isigny-sur-Mer yesterday, with the parking bays neatly separated by hedges.  It’s free and it had a borne for water which cost €2 for 100 litres.  The aire is on the Quay Neuf, on the Port de Plaisance, nicely signposted and easy to find.

 

Motorhome aire at Isigny-sur-Mer, neatly divided by hedges

Motorhome aire at Isigny-sur-Mer, neatly divided by hedges, Port de Plaisance

 

We strolled around town, which was very quiet, and to the end of the quay for some bird watching on the marshes and the lovely view out to Côte de Nacre.

 

Enjoying a refreshing beer at Port de Plaisance

Enjoying a refreshing beer at Port de Plaisance

 

Port de Plaisance

Port de Plaisance

 

Looking out at Cote de Nacre

Looking out at Cote  de Nacre

 

Tomorrow we’re heading northeast, to St Valerie-en-Caux, as we really liked it there last time, with its magnificent motorhome aire right on the pier under the white chalk cliffs so much like Dover.

Longues-sur-Mer, Saturday 30th October 2010

Standard

Wild camping in Longues-sur-Mer

It was a quiet and restful night at Arromanches aire, even though it was full.  I woke up half way through the night feeling hungry after my meager supper at the bistro, but managed to hold on till breakfast, which consisted of lovely ‘lingots au chocolat’ and coffee.

Soon after 9.30 am we set off to visit the D Day Museum, which was fascinating, as expected, with its video of how the Mulberry Harbour was built in Britain in pieces and brought to these shores on ships: what a vision of that great man, Churchill!

Plaque outside D Day Museu

Mulberry Harbour from cliff top

We also visited the 360º cinema showing the film ‘The Price of Freedom’, again very moving and humbling and well worth a visit.  You stand in the middle of the auditorium and you feel as if you are on one of the landing ships, with guns firing at you from the beach and cliffs ahead.  You are also surrounded by aero planes, deafened by the noise of the engines, but being part of the battle at the same time, viewing the land from above.  You see people and animals and it’s all extremely real.  It really brings into perspective the horror that these incredibly brave young men went through and the sacrifices they made for our freedom.  I don’t think I will ever forget that harrowing experience and I will always feel grateful to those men I never met for having the freedom to travel and enjoy Europe as I please.

Mulberry Harbour from a distance

After that, we strolled on the beach back to aire, taking more pictures of the remains of the Mulberry Harbour in better light, as it was a beautiful sunny and warm autumn morning.

We then drove to Longues-sur-Mer, where we parked for the rest of the day.  We had usual lunch, siesta and another walk to see the numerous German batteries and pill boxes on the cliff top, still in extraordinary good condition, guns and all, as if it had only been left yesterday!  They were obviously built to last!

German Pill Boxes

We also walked down to the beach and admired the cliffs formation from below.  Back in the ranch, we read for a bit and we’ve just finished dinner of cassoulet for Adonis and remainder of ‘Spag Bol’ for me (much better than the rubbish I had last night).

I am about to finish my Florence Nightingale book and, as every time I come to the end of any book, I feel a bit sad and don’t want to finish it, but another good book will follow, no doubt.

Gun

 

 

 

German Bunker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remains of Mulberry Harbour in better light

 

 

 

 

 

Arromanches, Friday, 29th October 2010

Standard

Ivy-covered building at Lude

So we made it here in a day.  Didn’t stop at Lude as Chateau was shut for the winter, which was very disappointing indeed.  Nevertheless, town looked very pretty and took pictures of ivy-covered buildings in the square and outside of chateau.  I’d love to go back in April, when it opens again, and have a proper look inside and around gardens.

Ivy-covered building at Lude

We had a coffee in a popular café opposite the car-park and then drove for a while until nearly 2 o’clock, when we stopped again at the Belle Branche woods near L’Etang de Curéci, off the D306 from La Flèche to Laval, where I would have loved to have the time for a walk and a explore.  A place to mark on the map for future reference, as I believe we could have stopped for the night.

Lude Chateau, closed from October to April

After lunch, we set off again and without further stops we got here for 6 pm.  We stopped at the aire near the beach and were lucky to get a parking space, as it’s full now (14 spaces in total).

Remains of Mulberry Harbour at Arromanches

We took Bramble for a walk on the beach and took pictures of remains of war-time Mulberry Harbour, which look quite eerie and scary now.  The museum opens at 9.30 am, so we’ll visit it tomorrow after breakfast.

Remains of Mulberry Harbour at Arromanches

 

After walk, we went for a meal in a bistro and I have to admit that I’ve just had the most disgusting main course in my entire life.  Adonis and I shared a lovely first course of Moules à la Normande, which we really enjoyed, but then I made the mistake of ordering the pork for a change (which I never ever do) and I soon regretted my choice.  Whilst Adonis was enjoying his beef, I had to content with some revolting slippery, rubbery, poor-excuse-for-a-meat dish, fatty slices of pork, which I couldn’t eat.  All for the privilege of 12 E.  I’ll remember NOT to order pork in France in future ever again!

Remains of Mulberry Harbour at Arromanches

All this was accompanied by the most unoriginal, boring music videos, so it’s not with great surprise that we didn’t stay there long.

We are now back in our cozy motorhome listening to the rain (far better sound than that awful music.  I am going to carry on with my book, forget about horrible meal and, hopefully, fall asleep.

A better day tomorrow.

Remains of Mulberry Harbour at Arromanches