Tag Archives: Géant du Manio

Pont Réan, Guichen Aire, Ille-et-Vilaine, Monday 28th October 2013

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Well, we have survived the storm that was supposed to hit Brittany at 80 m.p.h last night, although we both agree that it had been far worse the night before at Quiberon.

 

We survived the storm at Quiberon

We survived the storm at Quiberon

 

Something quite amusing happened yesterday morning. As we were leaving the aire at 9 am, we encountered a few vans parked around the exit, with a van trying to squeeze out between the bollard and the paying machine using levelling blocks, as this had broken down and nobody could get out. I was told help had been called for, but being Sunday it might take a little while. A frustrated camper tried jumping on the bollard itself to make it go down, but to no avail, but at least it provided a few moments of entertainment. A few minutes later, the gendarme arrived, but he couldn’t do anything either and even tried kicking it, which, of course, didn’t work! The guard finally arrived at 9.20 am and operated the system manually and we were able to leave without further ado. Very efficient, we thought, and we carried on merrily on our way.

 

A wet walk on Port Blanc

A wet walk on Port Blanc

We spent Sunday afternoon and night at the new motorhome aire at Baden, situated on Route de Port Blanc, Kerhilio, at 800 metres from the jetty de L’Ile aux Moines (www.airedesiles.fr) This is quite an impressive and beautifully kept motorhome aire and the 8 daily fee for this time of year included electricity hook-up, wifi and showers, although these were switched off! The water borne operated with a €2 coin and we were more than happy to pay for this, as we were running a bit low and desperately needed a shower. The aire has room for 50 motorhomes, but there were only 3 last night, well protected from the strong winds by the surrounding trees.

 

Stopping by the oyster beds

Stopping by the oyster beds

 

We loved the walk down to the beach and seeing the oyster beds in the fishing village. It was raining quite heavily at one point, but we didn’t really mind as the scenery was so lovely.

Oyster beds

Oyster beds

 

Oyster beds under water

Oyster beds under water

 

We went to Port Blanc after making a final visit to the Carnac Alignments at Kerlescan, with its 13 rows of the best preserved menhirs and the impressive Géant du Manio, which stands 6 metres high, and its Quadrilateral. This is situated just a short and pleasant walk through the woods from the D196 road.

Getting excited about finding the Giant!

Getting excited about finding the Giant!

 

The Quadrilateral at Manio

The Quadrilateral at Manio

 

The Gian at last!

The Gian at last!

 

 

Little me by the Giant of Manio

Little me by the Giant of Manio

This morning, we left in a downpour and got rather wet whilst filling up with water and emptying the grey water tank, but the rain cleared soon after and it has remained a sunny and warm day (22 ºC in van at the moment at 5 pm). We went back on the D101 to north of Vannes, N166 to Bohal, about 10 miles south of Ploërmel, D776 to Guer, D772 to north of Guichen and D577 to Pont Réan, about 6 miles south of Rennes.

 

The motorhome aire by the Vilaine river

The motorhome aire by the Vilaine river and stone bridge

We are parked right by the Vilaine river, with a beautiful and picturesque view of the stone bridge on La Cale de Pont Réan, Rue de Redon. It really is lovely here, with 10 pitches for €5 a day, which is collected by a guard in the evening.

 

The charming stone bridge at Pont Réan

The charming stone bridge at Pont Réan

There are lots of people walking along the river, so it seems to be a very popular place, with a few restaurants and all kinds of shops, as well as canoeing and other water sports. This is another charming stop to bear in mind for future reference.

 

The river walk and motorhome aire viewed from the stone bridge

The river walk and motorhome aire viewed from the stone bridge

 

We are going towards Alençon tomorrow and have already made an appointment at the vet in Broglie for Beano’s worming before returning home on Saturday.

 

The quay and access for water sports at Pont Réan

The quay and access for water sports at Pont Réan

Quiberon, Morbihan Department, Brittany, Saturday 26th October 2013

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Côte Sauvage or Wild Coast at Quiberon

Côte Sauvage or Wild Coast at Quiberon

 

This has been our first ever day in the Brittany region and we have certainly made the most of it.

 

Magnifcent sunset at Oudon

Magnifcent sunset at Oudon

 

We were woken up at 7.30 am by Beano, who seemed a bit unsettled or upset about something (perhaps the early trains going past near the campsite at Oudon), so we were ready to leave Oudon by 9 am, back on the D723 to join the motorway north east of Nantes at junction 41 and on to the N844/A82/N165/E60 (Why so many names for one road???) towards Vannes and on to south west of Auray, where we headed south west to Carnac on the D768.

 

The Carnac Alignments

The Carnac Alignments

 

With only one break for coffee before 11 am at the lovely aire of Marzan at j.17, over the attractive view of the Vilaine river by La Roche Bernard, we were in Carnac by noon and, after deciding not to stop for the day at the motorhome aire in the town itself – lovely as it was -, we went back on the D196 just north of Carnac to have a look at the famous Neolithic site of The Carnac Alignments, made of thousands of 6,000 years old megaliths.

 

The Carnac alignments

The Carnac alignments

 

We stopped by the Visitors’ Centre at Le Ménec to go around the site and get some information about it. The leaflet says the village of Ménec was built within the enclosure, comprising 71 blocks which almost touch one another. This site currently has 1,050 stones running over a total length of 950 metres.

 

Ménec, built around the megaliths

Ménec, built within the enclosure

 

We really enjoyed our walk in the sun around this fascinating and intriguing site and finding out about their history and purpose. Built between the fifth and third millennia BC by sedentarised communities, the rows of menhirs and enclosures form part of individual tombs (mounds) and collective tombs (dolmens).

 

Some of the bigger megaliths at Ménec

Some of the bigger megaliths at Ménec

 

After our walk around the site, we made our way to Quiberon and, although we tried stopping for the day at various possible wild-camping spots, we decided on the official motorhome aire by the camping municipal de Kerné on Route de Port-Kerné, open all year and with room for 110 vehicles, with water but no electricity at only 6 a day. This wonderful aire is right on the coast and commands beautiful views of the very aptly named Côte Sauvage or Wild Coast.

 

The motorhome aire at Quiberon

The motorhome aire at Quiberon, Port-kerne

 

So after lunch and a little rest, we went for another long walk to enjoy the magnificent coastline and the sheer force of the ocean blowing the foam from the waves over the impressive cliffs, making it look like snow.

 

The wind 'playing' with the foam from the waves

The wind ‘playing’ with the foam from the waves, looking just like snow

 

The wind 'playing' the the foam from the waves

The wind ‘playing’ the the foam from the waves

 

It’s been very windy all day but still very warm, with temperatures in the van hitting 26ºC in late October! I am not complaining.

 

Loving the wind and the sea at Quiberon

Loving the wind and the sea at Quiberon

 

 Tomorrow, we are going to see the rest of the megaliths, including the Giant of Manio or Géant du Manio, which stands roughly 6 metres high! After that, we’re hoping to spend some time in the Golfe du Morbihan, which looks very interesting indeed.

 

Côte Sauvage or Wild Coast at Quiberon

Côte Sauvage or Wild Coast at Quiberon – more ‘snow’